Ke$ha Checks Herself Into Rehab: How To Help A Friend Who’s Struggling

Photo: (Getty)

Photo: (Getty)

Ke$ha recently released a statement saying, “I’m a crusader for being yourself and loving yourself, but I’ve found it hard to practice. I’ll be unavailable for the next 30 days, seeking treatment for my eating disorder … to learn to love myself again, exactly as I am.” We applaud everyone brave enough to speak up and ask for help.  If you or someone you know is struggling with issues related to weight, food, self-image or depression, it’s important to reach out for support before things get worse. Here are some tips on how you can help a friend.

+ Reach Out and Listen

If you’re worried about a friend, just reach out to them and express your concerns in a nonjudgmental way.  Avoid trying to diagnose their situation by saying things like “I think you might have an eating disorder.”  Instead, explain why you are worried in a supportive way: “You have seemed really down on yourself lately, and I want to be there for you.”  Remember to listen and let your friend explain how they are feeling or what they’re going through — even if you don’t understand all of it.

+ Offer Help

Reaching out for professional help doesn’t mean you’re sick or crazy — it just means that you need a little help to deal with difficult feelings or situations.  It’s important to encourage a friend who is struggling to get that support.  To learn more about getting help and how to do it, visit HalfOfUs.

+ Give That Support

An important part of managing an eating disorder or conditions like depression is having a strong support network.  Be an ongoing part of your friend’s healing process and constantly remind them that you’re part of that network.

+ Take Care of Yourself

Sometimes trying to support a friend, especially one that might be resistant to getting help, can be emotionally draining.  If you are feeling overwhelmed, don’t be afraid to reach out for help yourself. And if a friend isn’t open to talking about their problem or getting help, reach out to a mutual friend, parent or a professional for guidance on what to do next.  You can also call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) anytime for a free conversation with a counselor who can recommend ways to get help for yourself or a friend.

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Half Of Us

Half Of Us

Learn more about eating disorders and how to get support or help a friend with it.

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Facts From NEDA

Facts From NEDA

Get general information on eating disorder identification, prevention and treatment.